Felicity Brown’s Debut Collection is Set to be Huge.

The Fashion East new talent platform recently introduced us to the one to watch, Felicity Brown. Her collection of hand dyed, silk, ruffled dresses were inspired by a number of things including Japanese origami, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s paintings of showy girls in dishevelled, provoking dresses, as well as her own study of flowers. The feminine dresses show off layers of delicate silks lovingly hand-dyed in blues, oranges and yellows on a cream base.

Felicity Brown was first spotted during her final university show, in which the collection was selected to be exhibited at Sotherby’s of London. She went on to design for Alberta Ferretti, Loewe, Mulberry and Lanvin before setting up her own label based in Brick Lane, London. Her 23 t-shirts collection  show off an array of bold prints, and one off designs, highly influenced by tribal designs from around the world. She told Vogue.com: “I like looking at tribal costumes from all over the world and the way tribes mark themselves,” she said. “I find that much more fascinating than minimal tailoring. I made each individual piece that forms each dress separately. At the last minute I smashed it all together and that was it.”

Felicity’s influences include works by Picasso, Bedouin women and costume. Fabric types, hand-dying and printing are amongst her signature designs.

Felicity Brown was one of the main newcomers at Fashion East, and Tellusfashion.com predict that her original designs will be huge news over the coming months.

Images courtesy of London Fashion Week.

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