Posts tagged “Fashion design

Who Will Design Kate’s Dress?

With the Royal Wedding getting closer and closer, the question in all fashionista’s minds is: “Just who is designing Kate Middleton’s dress?”

Well the answer to that question is far from being revealed, leaving the anticipation for Friday even greater. So who are the potential labels in the running to be the royal wedding dress designer of the decade?

Sophie Cranston.

Image courtesy of thedailymail.co.uk

A major contender for the role, Sophie Cranston is the brains behind Libelula. She has previously won the 1999 Designer of the Year Award and went on to work with the likes of Alexander McQueen. Libelula, meaning dragonfly in Spanish, was created in 2002 and uses bold colours and prints on well cut, flattering clothes.

Bruce Oldfield.

 

Image courtesy of  Bruce Oldfield.

Bruce Oldfield is a famous British designer best known for his bridal designs. He graduated from Central Saint Martins College of Art in 1973. In the past he designed many outfits for Princess Diana, making him a strong nominee for the wedding designer. In 1990 he was a awarded an OBE for his contribution to the British fashion industry.

Jasper Conran

 

Image courtesy of  thedailymail.co.uk

Jasper Conran was also awarded an OBE for his contribution to the British fashion industry. Over his 20-years in the business he has successfully designed a popular Debenhams range, many women’s and menswear lines, as well as china and crystal for big brands. His signature designs revolve around the cut and silhouette of the clothing line. He also designed Princess Margaret’s daughters wedding dress in 1994.

Sarah Burton

 

Image courtesy of thedailymail.co.uk

A popular choice for the princess’s designer. Sarah Burton took on the role of Creative Director for Alexander McQueen after his death in 2010. She managed to produce a great first collection and has been rumoured to have designed the royal dress for the past few months.

 

Daniella Helayel

 

Image courtesy of Issa London

Designer of the label Issa, Daniella Helayel is said to be Kate’s favourite designer. She has also bagged herself an invite to the wedding, could this mean she is the one? Her signature style is bright and feminine.

Alice Temperley

 

Image courtesy of Temperley London

Kate’s sister was seen in this Alice Temperley’s shop recently, arousing suspicion that this could be the royal designer. Her label launched in 2000 for London Fashion Week and has since become more and more prestigious. The label specialises in wedding gowns for brides, bridesmaids, mothers of the bride and guests.

Philipa Lepley

 

Image courtesy of bridesmagazine.co.uk

Philipa Lepley is one of the bookies faves. Her bridal business began in 1988 in South Kensington and business has been booming ever since. Her designs often appear in top bridal magazines.

 

Let Tellusfashion know who you think it will be.


Corrie Neilsen.

Tellusfashion enjoy seeking out new designers, especially ones which are set to make the big time in the very near future.

Corrie Neilsen is just the type of designer we love discovering. Her style is romantic, drawing influences upon 18th century illustrators James Gillray and George Cruikshank. The A/W 11 collection is full of masculine tailoring in dark blacks and greys.

Corrie Neilsen graduated from Central Saint Martins in 2004 with a BA First Class Honours Degree in Fashion Design Womenswear. She has since gone on to do various freelance projects before designing her own label.

The highlight of her career was when she won Fashion Fringe in 2010. Fashion Fringe is a nationwide search to discover new talent in cutting edge design across the UK.

We predict there are plenty more highlights to come for this American designer.

Images courtesy of London Fashion Week


Molly and Alice Goddard.

Molly and Alice Goddard are the new kids on the block. They are sisters which have one major thing in common; they share a passion for fashion.

 

Both girls have had previous successes in the fashion business; Molly studying knitwear at Central Saint Martins, and Alice, a model who has almost given up the glitz and glam to follow in her sisters footsteps in the world of designing.

 

Alice describes their new label, which is named Lovetits, as “sheer tops with things covering the boobies”

 

Alice told i-D Online: “It’s hard working [with Molly] because you don’t stop yourself saying what you think in the way you would with a friend. Our creative process involves a lot of shouting. We’d like to work together in the future, but keep what we’re doing now separate. I’m thinking about studying footwear next year. Molly does knitwear at Saint Martins and is amazing, I’d love to make the shoes and accessories for her collection but I’m too indecisive to work alone.”

 

Tellusfashion predict huge things for this brand, which has already been featured in the likes of Grazia. Keep up the good work girls!

Above: one of Molly’s knitwear designs, image courtesy of Bipling.com.

Below: Image courtesy of Lovetits


Sarah Burton’s Collection Stuns Audiences.

Sarah Burton was perhaps the woman with the biggest expectations thrust upon her shoulders. She is the woman that was famously handed the Alexander McQueen legacy, the woman that had to live up to huge standards and make the deceased Lee Alexander McQueen proud.

 

Here at Tellusfashion we believe she has done just that. And it is not just us that think this, many fashion critics across the globe agree. Her autumn/winter collection was showcased at Paris Fashion Week, and many acclaimed the likeness, and indeed the believed approval, of the collection to her predecessor.

 

The collection, entitled ‘The Ice Queen and her Court’ used shades of white, black and lilac, embodied onto the typical McQueen silhouette. Hand-loomed silks, wool tweeds, animal fur, velvet and organza adorned the collection, giving this icy show a softer edge to it.

 

The general thoughts on the collection were unanimous; she really had surpassed expectation. She is everything the late Alexander McQueen would have hoped for and possibly more in his successor.

 

And what is more, there are rumours that a certain princess has asked the McQueen fashion house to design her wedding gown. Things are sure going in the right direction for Ms Burton!Images courtesy of Style.com


Suzanne Rae Mixes Feminist With Feminine in Her Unique AW11 Collection.

Hot off the heels of the press in America, Tellusfashion predict that Suzanne Rae will make it big internationally very shortly. Her autumn/winter collection, which took New York fashion week by storm, makes a feminist statement using bold designs. However, she has cleverly incorporated femininity into these feminist styles, mixing tough wool with sensual silk and strong masculine tailored pieces made ladylike and glamorous.

 

For her autumn/winter collection, dark colours such as blacks and greys are textured with plaits and lace making this a unique grungy yet girly and sophisticated collection. Other materials she has used include sustainable hemp and light shades of silk. The contrast works really well, and sets her apart from other up and coming designers. She said: “I’m exploring the individual vs. the collective

unconsciousness…and how we can liberate ourselves from this…how we can be everything…the strong woman, the appropriate woman (perhaps as opposed to the ‘proper’ woman), the liberated, explorative, alive individual…”

 

Suzanne Rae Pelaez graduated from Parson School of Design, and now lives and works in Brooklyn. Her label, Suzanne Rae, aims to construct garments in a traditional way with a difference, experimenting with draping dresses and patterns.

 

Suzanne Rae has had three previously successful collections exhibited at New York Fashion Week. Her spring/summer collection displayed floaty, loose feminine dresses in layered style at the back and which rose shorter towards the front, all in light, floral colours and tied around the waist, rope-like belts.

 

She often collaborates with different designers for her shows, including accessories designer Yestadt Millinery and shoe designers Dieppa Restrepo.

 

Watch out for her coming collections.Images courtesy of Eco-chick.com


David Koma Was One of London Fashion Weeks Best Designers.

London Fashion Week ended last Wednesday, and once again it has not let us down. Newgen selected its best new designers and left us fashion enthusiasts here at Tellusfashion amazed with the stunning new talent that it is able to produce year in, year out. David Koma was one of London Fashion Week’s big names this year. His feminine designs contour the body giving him his signature style.

 

David graduated from Central St Martins College of Design in April 2009 with a distinction in MA fashion. His graduate collection won the Harrods Design Award, which subsequently resulted in his designed being lapped up by celebrities. Beyonce, Lady Gaga, Rihanna, Megan Fox, Alicia Keys, Cheryl Cole and Kylie are all fans of David Koma’s designs.

 

His spring/summer collection sees girly pinks and creams based on perfect, body hugging silhouette dresses. Whereas his autumn/winter collection is set to have a darker side to it, inspired by Tim Burton, dark forests and hallucinations. The one thing that remains loyal to both collections is the feminine elegance and figure loving bodices that encapsulate his designs.

Images are a mixture of both his spring/summer and autumn/winter collection and are courtesy of London Fashion Week.


Mary Katrantzou Shakes the World of Fashion.

In her first stand alone show, Mary Katrantzou wowed fashion boffins all over the world at London Fashion Week, and even managed to secure the appearance of one of her dresses on the pages of American Vogue. She has recently given the lampshade skirt fame, and has already stamped her signature onto the art of laser-printing photographs onto clothing. There is no end to this lady’s creative talent! Mary Katrantzou first made people notice in 2008 during her graduating show where she used simple dresses as a base for bold photographic images. Since then, her style has progressed to become somewhat daring. Her latest show saw furniture inspired pieces grace the runway in a true trompe l’oeil fashion. From the lampshade skirt (which took hours to perfect each one through moulding, wiring, bonding and fusing), to the pelmet-adorned dresses. She told the London Evening Standard: ‘It was on the verge of being too gimmicky and a total flop. I had the fear all the way through designing it that it was all too much. I remember telling my boyfriend, “If people actually like this it will give me a huge boost to trust my instincts, but if it’s a disaster I’m going have to start again.”‘ Of course it wasn’t a disaster, and many celebrities have already snapped up some of her pieces, such as Claudia Schiffer, Rosamund Pike and Yasmin LeBon. What’s next for this enthusiastic designer? For autumn/winter 2011 she plans to experiment with knitwear, and transfer some of her bright, photorealistic graphics onto cardigans and jumpers. Keep your eye on the pages of tellusfashion.com for updates! Images courtesy of fashion.telegraph.co.uk


Growing a Fashion Label…Learnings

Hello beautiful people!

It’s been a little while but I’m back!

So much has happened since my last post; finally got sample 1 of my collection completed! Huge Yeah!!!

It’s a dress – that’s all I’m saying at the moment :). I love it and I’ve had really good feedback from those who’ve seen it – so encouraging. Now we need to complete the collection and start some serious marketing and hopefully sales.

So you know this blog is about my journey from the idea to your wardrobe right? I’ll let you in on a couple of my learnings in the recent weeks.

Reality over dreams

Surfboard on beach

Creating the sample creation can be quite a tedious process and that’s just sourcing the fabric and trimmings. I learnt the hard way with sample 1, found a fabric I loved for the design but then realised there wasnt enough of it for the sample; a blessing in disguise as the fabric couldn’t be sourced quickly enough for spontaneous orders. So whilst I’d oomed and arrhed at this particular fabric, there was no point going ahead with it knowing “Department Store S” on Bond street could require 100 pieces with a 6 week turn round and half of that time spent would be just waiting for fabric to arrive; that was a no-no! So it was off to source a similar fabric, asked for 300 mtrs within a week – if the fabric store is confident enough to get you that quantity, then you’re on the right path to finding a fabric you can be confident to use. And that my dear friends is what I did to find the fabric that made the cut for our sample 1. It is possible that I probably would have known this as part of a 3 year fashion design course but as we’re learning on the go, I take this as part of my lot :). Lesson learnt, so we move on!

Keep your Business Plan dynamic

Close-up of rolled up Indian banknotes on a chessboard with chess pieces Horizontal

In all my learnings whether in Marketing or as part of my degree, one thing I always heard was that the business plan is a moving document. I had not realised how true that statement was; I can definitely attest to it now.

I have a friend who’s launching her own business also and we serve as accountability partners to each other – the business we’re running now have developed compared to the ideas we started with. With more research comes more understanding of the product and the environment our businesses will operate in and it therefore makes absolute sense to be fluid enough to ensure that the business plan adjusts accordingly otherwise, our projects might never see the light of day or even last no longer than a season – no one wants that.

So any fashion entrepreneurs out there with similar experiences to mine or something I havent even mentioned that we could benefit from? Please share.

I’m off now and will come back before the end of the week with some fashion related (as opposed to business focused) post.

Be good and have a fruitful week ahead!

Much love

T


Time to get our Ducks in a row…

Hello!!!

It feels like ages since I last updated the blog. I trust you’re well and week going good so far?

So what have I been up to? Last week felt like I was running against bricks and it wasnt very nice. I guess that’s business for you, infact, that’s life really. Nonetheless, I remained and continue to remain positive.

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Time seems to be running away!

Not sure if I’ve mentioned previously but we are looking to launch the label in Spring/Summer 2011 and that my friends is not far away at all. According to my industry veterans, I should have agreed orders by now and be working on deliveries to Stockists in time for Jan…If that’s the case, I was late even before the label was created :S.

It’s a little (very little) worrying but when did ‘customary’ ever put me off anything? Never! Every Drapers (trade magazine) edition I have read since my Subscription started in Summer has mentioned the increasing flexibility of buyers to purchase outside of the normal buying periods. However, I am fully aware that as we (Toni Bonoj) get bigger, volume of production will require that we work close with industry time tables to ensure we can meet order requests and ensure customer satisfaction which I am thoroughly passionate about.

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Headache Moment

So that said, where am I in the production cycle? Point zero; creating samples. Fun (NOT) of a new starter is searching for a production team to work with. It makes absolute sense that the team that creates the samples get the work for production also as you will have established a working relationship and ironed out any possible issues with production. Number one problem arises as not all clothing manufacturers work on samples because it’s often more work than they can charge for; many see it as loss leading activity. So even if a manufacturer’s price sounds good, without them creating samples initially, one has to take the risk and go ahead with production and keep fingers crossed. The other thing I have found is manufacturers are often unable to give an exact quote on production cost. I understand why this might be, but how does that help with my planning? So, as its difficult to pen costs down to an exact amount, best thing to do is to allow yourself a range to work with.

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Business Accounts – Snooze button

Today, I went about trying to set up a business account. No kidding, some women could have had babies in the time it took me to b e interviewed by a certain High Street bank and no, I still dont have a business account yet. It was a painful experience but as I try to learn from everything, here are my tips for anyone trying to set a business account up:

  • Your time is important, set a time limit for the meeting and let the Business account manager know this
  • Know what you want from the bank account
  • Dont be persuaded by any additional fancy products, you will find that many of these are available on the internet for free or at a lower price
  • Dont make any decision under duress, take away literature so you can read and make a decision later
  • I know it wasn’t their intention, but I felt they wore me out so I could just say yes to everything 🙂
  • Finally, do compare offers from different banks. You’ll be surprised at how many different offerings and propositions there are out there!

On that note, I’m signing out.

Have a fantastic week ahead!

T


What do you wear to work?

Hello beautiful people!

You may have picked up from my first post that I do have something for formal wear. With a full-time job, most people spend more time at work than at home so if I am going to splash a little on clothes, work wear comes on top for me.

I am a firm believer in dressing for the role you’re aiming for not for where you are – so I can’t see any reason why any woman’s formal wardrobe should be dowdy.

We all know clothes speaks volumes about us and in some circumstances it could affect our demeanour. If you’re wearing an outfit that accentuates the right parts of your figure, you feel confident and your walk speaks the same language. And if you feel good about yourself, then you’ll attract that from other people.

So am I alone in feeling this way? Would you put much effort into your work wear? Are there particular pieces that work for you more than other?

For me, I love my soft tops and fitted shirts with smart tailored trousers or skirts. I might have been in a cut throat environment but I am still a woman and want to be sexy 🙂

Peter Jensen Helena Frill Blouse
Peter Jensen Helena Frill blouse – this top is fantastic for all shapes – I love the detail

I  would love to hear from you, so tell me about your favourite pieces of clothing for work.

Cheers

T


Who is Toni Bonoj?

First things first, I cannot believe this is happening to me! The last few months have been nothing less than amazing, a rollercoaster ride and begging God daily – we cannot stop this ride now, please.

Lets get to a better introduction, my name is Tosin (toes-in), I am youngish years old, and a budding International fashion designer and label owner. I guess the fact I have a business makes me a business woman too? Nothing sounds sexier than that; Entrepreneur, nice.

I don’t have the same background as most fashion designers because I spent a long time using the left side of my brain doing non creative stuff like completing A’ levels in Physics, Maths and Computing Studies, followed by a degree in Information Engineering and Technology Management then 10 years working with blue chip companies gaining experience in IT, Management Information and Marketing as well as accumulating several certificates to help me perform my job better. So you see what I mean when I say ‘I’m not your usual fashion designer’? So how did I end up where I am today?

Well, earlier this year I lost my job in the city, I was very ill and for the first time since I was 17 years old, I had time to think of what I would really LOVE to do next. When you’ve had a job since you were legally allowed to, and suddenly lose your job (which I later found out was very central to me), there is an initial feeling of shock and despair (well there was for me), add denial too. I wanted to go find a new role immediately but I couldn’t. Whilst I got myself better, I had a light bulb moment of styling my own work wear, usually these thoughts come and disappear as soon as they arrive because my busy life wouldn’t have allowed it; I was always rushing from one thing to the other. In my previous job, commuting to London meant very long days, so having time to think outside of my job, role as a wife and Sunday school teacher was a luxury!

Back to my light bulb moment, well I had more time on my hands so I began to enquire about tailors I could work with to design my outfits. Soon enough I wondered to myself why I couldn’t make these clothes and sell them. I had a niche idea (which I will tell you more about later) and was certain there would be many people who would want to buy these outfits. That was it, I started drawing and loved my drawings even as amateurish as they looked. I prayed about it and trusted God to make things work alright.

I slept on the idea for a few more months but was lucky to speak to a fashion designer friend of a friend – that was fantastic! She suggested I attend a short course at one of London’s art colleges and contact my local college re: Sewing or garment construction. This was the best advice ever and if you’re like me, coming into the Fashion Industry with little knowledge of it and would like to pursue a fashion designing career, I would really advocate this route. Sewing courses can be really cheap or even free at your local college so unless you want to major as a seamstress, the most important knowledge worth paying for is how the industry works; releasing collections, understanding the customer, trend research, the fashion calendar and important people who make the industry tick just to mention a few.

If you are young or not in a hurry to run your business as I was, then go ahead and get a degree from a University; find one that is very respected worldwide and whose students have gone on to successful careers. In London, I can suggest London College of Fashion and Central Saint Martins College of arts; they are both renowned colleges worldwide. Do your research, competition will be high for entry places – good luck!

So there we go, a little introduction about me. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading? Don’t hesitate to leave a comment, it would be nice to know your thoughts, did you find any of the information useful? Or maybe you have questions, let me know.

I will be back in a few days, until then I will leave you with this thought:

You only have one life, live it to its fullest. It sounds corny but it is true. Follow your passion and when you do, you’ll never have to work again because everyday will be like enjoying your hobby!

Catch you later!

Much love

T

xxx